The Wonderful Drobo – A New Data Storage System For Serious Photographers

As a photographer I always struggle with the massive issue of information storage capability. With electronic shooting I take a lot of raw pictures and that I take mainly in RAW format. These pictures occupy a great deal of disk space.

I recently had the chance to obtain a Drobo. What the hell is that a Drobo? It’s a Drobo Storage System that’s a big in ability (not footprint) desktop unit with the ability to house up to four hard disks. It’s configured using something the Drobo folks call “Beyond RAID” storage technologies that protects against a tough disk failure. This tiny unit is expandable up to 16 terabytes of storage space for you personally files and photographs.

I bought the device via a third party Amazon spouse. I got the device using four Western Digital one TB Caviar Green SATA drives. Together with the proprietary RAID configuration it offered me TB of usable disk directly connected to my PC using a USB cable. The entire price was under $800.

It came with the suitable cushioning anticipated, and as anticipated had no damage during transport. The directions were incredibly simple: set the SATA drives in a drive bay, then attach the power cable and USB cable and install the application from the provided CD. No tools were demanded.

The drives slipped from the bays with no problem whatsoever (well I’d have to find out which side was up). Then I proceeded to attach the device to my PC and ran the Drobo Dashboard program. It immediately discovered the Drobo device and recommended that I format the drives. I did and a couple of minutes after I’d 3 terabytes of disc inserted to my platform for use as main backup or storage.

You may ask why I’d 3 terabytes of storage from 4 one terabyte drives. Here is the protocol (or system) known as RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks). In its simplest explanation this is really a data security system that takes your information and writes it into the disc in a manner that permits the information to be restored if among those disk drives fails.